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Tips on abandoned wells

Leaving a well in disrepair allows for a direct route for contaminants to get into the ground water. Things like animal waste, oils or fuels, or any number of chemicals can seriously damage the water we drink, or even render it completely unusable.

 

The property owner where the well is located could be held accountable if the contaminants leach into neighboring properties water supply. There are several things you should know when getting ready to decommission (abandon)  water well.

 

What to know:

What type of well are you dealing with?

 

a. A hand dug well

 

b. A drilled well

 

c. A monitor well

 

How deep is the well to be decommissioned?

 

Is there a well log available for the well? The Department of Ecology keeps records of all the well logs in the state that are registered.

 

Who is the legal property owner of the land where the well is located? Name address and phone number, are all required for the permit to decommission the well.

 

There is a $50.00 fee to the Department of Ecology for the permit.

 

There has to be a licensed well driller on site to legally decommission a well.

 

Check to see if your county has delegated authority to oversee the decommissioning process. Your well driller should know if your county is delegated.

 

The legal description of the property will be required for the permit, to include the Section, Township and Range numbers and the parcel number if available.

 

Ensuring all regulations are met

There are many reasons why a well should be decommissioned and all of the reasons come back to one central point, to protect the water resource that we all need and enjoy. It is vital that we leave the ground water in the best condition that we possibly can for future generations.

 

We at Fogle Pump are committed to making sure that all the state and federal regulations are followed and that there is clean, drinkable water left in the ground for our children and future generations.

 

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